jump to navigation

Training — New Shoes December 1, 2009

Posted by Richard Lowe in Training.
Tags: , , ,
trackback

Distance: 2.05 miles
Time: 19:14
Pace: 9:23 mile

I definitely needed to do a short run yesterday. After Sunday’s 14 mile run, I was feeling the hurt. My left hamstring and right calf were sore and both my knees were creaky. Guess that would be par for the course after a long run like that. But, I’m trying to get used to running while I’m still sore, so I mustered the energy to do a 2 mile run yesterday.

I also broke out my new pair of shoes—it was definitely time. During my longer runs, I could feel that the support in my old shoes wasn’t like it used to be. I also attribute some of my running pain to the worn-down sole of the old pair. Plus, I estimate that I have almost 500 miles on them, which is usually enough to warrant a change. According to this Sports Medicine article on About.com, between 350-550 miles is enough:

It is recommended that you replace running shoes between 350-550 miles depending on your running style, body weight, and the surface on which you run. Lighter runners can get closer to the upper end of the recommendation while heavier runners are harder on shoes and should consider replacement shoes closer to 350 miles.

Unfortunately, though, unveiling my new shoes isn’t as exciting as it seems because they’re actually the exact same shoe as my old ones. Booooooring.


New, same ol’ shoes.

But I love my old Brooks’ Adrenaline GTS 9, so I was actually looking to buy the same shoe. For one, they were comfortable and fit my flat feet pretty well. I didn’t want to risk buying a different pair of expensive running shoes and having them be uncomfortable or different in anyway. At this stage of the training (4 months away from the marathon), I didn’t feel like I had the time to experiment with a different shoe. Also, I lucked out and found the new pair at REI for 30% off the normal price, so that helped sway my decision.

I’ll probably still use my older shoes for 6-10 mile runs until I fully break in my new pair. I’ve heard recommendations, too, that it’s good to rotate shoes. However, my old pair are definitely near the retirement stage and will soon be relegated to the “Use During International Backpacking” part of my closet, along with my old No Fear t-shirts and worn blue jeans.

Honestly, though, I just need to suck it up and finally get the Vibram Five Finger.

Advertisements

Comments»

1. Yasmin - December 1, 2009

I’ve been sticking with the same pair for 3 years now, too. If it’s not broken, no need to fix it.

I totally want to try the Vibram too! I’ve heard you need to “acquaint” your feet to them, so you start with 1/4 mile distances until you build up. So… that would probably mean after the marathon.

2. RJL - December 1, 2009

I’ve heard the same thing about getting acquainted with the Vibram. So yeah, now that my marathon training is mainly 6-10 mile runs, looks like it’ll have to wait.

3. Karen N. - December 1, 2009

http://www.terraplana.com/the-evo

Don’t forget to check out this barefoot running option.

RJL - December 2, 2009

Just what I need: a competitor to the Vibram! But the Terra Plana shoes are way more expensive than Vibram’s—and not as creepy looking.

4. The Vegan Anti-Hero - December 2, 2009

Brook Adrenaline 9 are my favorite road running shoes. Seriously, if they ever stop making them chances are likely I’ll have to give up running. I could never replace them.

RJL - December 2, 2009

Yeah, they are a great pair of shoes! I almost asked REI if they had more in the back. I was considering stockpiling.

5. Zog - December 10, 2009

I’ve got a couple pairs of FiveFingers. It really is worth buying two so you can have one in the laundry while you wear the other. They do need to be washed often, but I’ve seen no washing machine wear on mine after a ton of washes.

Definitely start really slow, even if just for the first day or two. This isn’t to break in the shoe, it is to break in the foot. Your Achilles tendon will probably get a bit of a stretch back to the natural low-heel proportions as well. You will be shocked at how different they are. I’ve got a full review of my experiences with them here.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: